Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Found Object Plate Portrait

 

This is an emergency sub plan art lesson in the event that Mr. G is unexpectedly absent from school. You will be notified if you are assigned to complete this remote learning art activity. 

Found Object Plate Portraits


Build a portrait with various objects you can find around the house!

Step 1: Pick a plate and collect an array of objects from your house including small toys, kitchen items, office supplies, and more!
Step 2: Identify parts of the face and sort the items into categories such as eyes, noses, mouths, hair, ears, and such.
Step 3: Create a portrait using the objects. Move the items around to see what works best! Have fun!
Step 4: Take a photo so I can see your creative one-of-a-kind portraits!
Step 5: Return all items where they belong.

Mr. G made the 4 plate portraits below. 

Some of your favorite teachers took part in this art challenge as well! Check out their creative plate portraits! 




    
   


                                                 

Friday, October 9, 2020

2nd Grade Robots

                         Welcome to Art class at B. Bernice Young School! 


                    I'm your Art Teacher, Mr. Giannetto (Mr. G).

I'm so excited to begin the 2020-2021 school year with you! 

Please reach out to me if you have any questions, concerns, or if you need clarification or assistance with any art project. During remote learning you are always welcome to substitute art materials for any given project with supplies you have available to you at home. You do not need to submit, turn in, or email any artwork at this time. I will assess your work during our Wednesday Google Meet.

Mr. Giannetto's email is vgiannetto@burltwpsch.org

Please follow me on Facebook: Young School Art with Mr. Giannetto
and Instagram @youngschoolartwithmr.g.

2nd Grade ART October 26th-30th 

Monday and Tuesday: I will see the Monday/Tuesday cohort at Young School for in-person learning. We will work on robot art activities in class. All remote learners and the Thursday/Friday cohort will view and complete art assignments that Mr. G posts in our Google Art Classroom. Art activities include recorded videos of Mr. G reading robot books and demonstrating step-by-step robot drawings for you to complete independently. In our Google Art Classroom I also include a link for you to travel here to my art website and follow the paper robot art lesson below.  In addition, scroll down and view Additional Art Activities for Remote Learners as well as a fun tinfoil cardboard robot art lesson. You have all week to complete all robot projects.

Wednesday: All student Google Meet for virtual Art class. This is the only Google Meet for art class this week! If you started the paper robot project below independently on Monday and Tuesday at home bring it to the Google Meet and I will assess your progress and demonstrate adding details to the robot. If you did not begin the project, I will demonstrate how to get started and you can continue working independently as the week progresses. 

Thursday and FridayI will see the Thursday/Friday cohort at Young School for in-person learning. We will work on robot art activities in class. All remote learners and the Monday/Tuesday cohort will view and complete art assignments that Mr. G posts in our Google Art Classroom. Art activities include recorded videos of Mr. G reading robot books and demonstrating step-by-step robot drawings for you to complete independently. In our Google Art Classroom I also include a link for you to travel here to my art website and follow the paper robot art lesson below.  In addition, scroll down and view Additional Art Activities for Remote Learners as well as a fun tinfoil cardboard robot art project. You have all week to complete all robot projects.

2nd Grade Pop-Up Robots

Remember we will work on this project together on Wednesday during our Google Meet. You are also welcome to work independently on Monday/Tuesday or on Thursday/Friday while you are learning from home. You have all week to complete your paper robot. 

Materials: paper, glue, scissors, markers

Function: What does your robot do? How does it help you?

Name:What do you call your robot?

Price: How much does the robot cost? 


What type of robot do you want to make? 

A Chef Bot can help with cooking and baking.

A Homework Bot can do your homework for you.

A Coach Bot can help you with sports.

An Art Bot can help you draw and paint.

A Friend Bot can keep you company and play with you all day.

Step 1: Cut out a variety of shapes to make your robot. Squares, rectangles, and circles work very well. 

Step 2: Decide how each shape will be used to build your robot. Begin to identify the head, body, legs/wheels, and arms.  Manipulate some of the shapes by folding the edges. This will help the shapes pop up when we glue them to the paper. Fold some of the shapes into accordion folds. Create rings by gluing the ends of a thin rectangle together. 


Step 3: Glue the robot parts to a new piece of paper. Pop-up some of the robot parts by only gluing down the folded areas. 

Step 4: Add details with markers such as a face, nuts and bolts, buttons, dials, and computer screens.

Step 5: Identify the function of the robot. Add additional details in order for the robot to have the supplies it needs to help you. For example, a Chef Bot may need pots and pans. An Art Bot may need pencils, scissors, and a paintbrush. A Sports Bot may carry balls, bats, or other sports equipment. Identify a price for your robot. How much does it cost? 



  


 Additional Art Activities for Remote Learners:

        1.  Draw a robot using the idea sheets below. Combine the head, body,                     arms, and movement. Add your own ideas as well. 



2. Read the book Unplugged by Steve Antony and draw the character Blip. Mr. G recorded a video reading the book and a step-by-step tutorial of how to draw the robot Blip. The video link can be found in your art assignment on google classroom. Have fun drawing!

 


3. Read the book Boy + Bot and complete the directed drawing. Color your drawing as well. The recorded video of Mr. G reading the book and drawing Bot can be found in my Google Classroom. 



Optional Remote Learning Cardboard Tinfoil Robots

Robots can help us with everyday tasks. What would you like your robot to do? What is its function? Maybe you would like a chef, maid, or teacher robot? A robot that can cook, clean, and do your homework may be very popular! 



Identify the following: 
A robot name
A robot function (How does it help you?/What does it do?)
A robot price (How much does it cost?) 

Art Materials: cardboard, cereal box, scissors, tinfoil, glue, paper, sharpie

Step 1: Cut a variety of shapes out of cardboard and/or cereal boxes. Rectangles, squares, and circles would be great! Parents may need to assist with cutting out some of the thicker cardboard pieces. 




Step 2: Begin to wrap the pieces of cardboard in tinfoil. 




Step 3: Move the pieces around and decide what works best to create the robots head, body, arms, wheels or legs.




Step 4: Use a sharpie to add details to your robot including a face, computer screen, nuts and bolts, and other details. As you're adding details make sure the design meets the function of your robot. For example, if the robot is a teacher you can add books or a pencil. If your robot makes dinner be sure to add food and utensils. 




Step 5: Glue the pieces to a piece of paper and write down the name, function, and price of your robot.


Talk About Art
What was the most challenging part of making a robot?
What is the function of your robot?
Does your family want to buy your robot?





Friday, September 18, 2020

Back to School Night 2020

Back to School Night 2020!

Kindergarten Art

1st Grade Art

2nd Grade Art

I'm Mr. Giannetto (Mr. G), Young School Art Teacher.

 I'm so excited to begin the 2020-2021 school year with you! 

Please reach out to me if you have any questions, concerns, or if you need clarification or assistance with any art project. During remote learning you are always welcome to substitute art materials for any given project with supplies you have available to you at home. 

Mr. Giannetto's email is vgiannetto@burltwpsch.org

Please follow me on Facebook: Young School Art with Mr. Giannetto
and Instagram @youngschoolartwithmr.g to discover additional art projects. 

Art class is filled with drawing, coloring, cutting, gluing, painting, building, and more! 


I will see you for Art class remotely for twenty minutes, M-F, every nine weeks. At the beginning of each of your scheduled art classes you will join our google meet and I will chat with you for a bit, introduce the art lesson of the week and get you started on the project. Then, you will click the link provided on the google classroom assignment to travel here to my website, view lesson directions in detail, and work on your own for the remaining time in art class. There is one art assignment per week that will carry over from day to day and is due at the end of the week. We will celebrate with Art Show Fridays! We will share what we have created and celebrate all of our Young School artists! I can't wait to see what you make! Information about Art class during hybrid learning will be forthcoming. 



I'm beginning my 19th year teaching Elementary Art in BTSD. My focus is on young learners in Kindergarten, 1st, and 2nd Grade. Each day is an adventure filled with paint spills and progress! I love to see my students discover new things, problem solve, and take artistic risks. I believe art is for everyone and every child is an artist! A child's creativity is boundless and their enthusiasm for art is contagious! As an art educator I promote and advocate for Art & Literacy, STEAM Learning, Multicultural Art, Interdisciplinary Learning, Process Art, and Collaborative Art. 



Young School Artists are Soaring to Success! 

Students earn Falcon Feathers when they are being Respectful, Kind, and Safe! Young School Artists may also earn the Star Student Award in art class during in-person learning. 





ART Class Expectations
A- Always follow directions.
R- Respect your teacher, classmates, artwork, and art supplies.
T- Try your best! 




Remote Art Class Reminders

1. Gather your art supplies before class begins.
2. Find a quiet place to log on.
3. Arrive on time.
4. Greet Mr. G with a HELLO!
5. Mute your microphone.
6. Be attentive to the instructions and follow along.
7. Review Mr G's website if you missed a Google Meet or need to review directions in detail.
8. Try your best! 
9. Have fun! 
10. Remember you are an ARTIST and Mr. G is proud of you! 


1st Grade Art: Line Roller Coaster

              Welcome to Art class at B. Bernice Young School! 

        I'm your Art Teacher, Mr. Giannetto (Mr. G).

I'm so excited to begin the 2020-2021 school year with you! 

Please reach out to me if you have any questions, concerns, or if you need clarification or assistance with any art project. During remote learning you are always welcome to substitute art materials for any given project with supplies you have available to you at home. 

Mr. Giannetto's email is vgiannetto@burltwpsch.org

Please follow me on Facebook: Young School Art with Mr. Giannetto
and Instagram @youngschoolartwithmr.g.

Art Class for Ms. Shaw and Ms. Petrecca
October 26th-30th



Tuesday: Ms. Shaw's Class- I will see all students who are attending school for in-person art class. 

Wednesday: Ms. Shaw's class and Ms. Petrecca's class have a Google Meet with Mr. G together. I will demonstrate making the line roll coaster. Please review the materials below and have them available to use on our Google Meet. I understand that some students in Ms. Petrecca's class may have completed the Line Roller Coaster with Mr. G a few weeks ago. During our Wednesday Google Meet I will give you additional ideas to vary this assignment. 

Thursday: Ms. Petrecca's Class- I will see all students who are attending school for in-person art class. 

Everyday this Week: Feel free to visit our Google Art Classroom, view the art assignment, and click the link to travel here to my art website and work independently on this Line Roller Coaster. I will also include optional art activities for remote learning. Scroll down to view Additional Art Activities for Remote Learners. Also, in our Google Art Classroom I have a recorded video of Mr G reading a roller coaster book with a directed drawing activity for you to complete independently. 



1st Grade Art: Line Roller Coaster

Materials: construction paper (choose any colors you wish and have available at home), scissors, glue, crayons



Types of Lines:


Step by Step Directions:

Step 1: Cut long strips of colorful paper. These will be the tracks for your roller coaster. Fold up both ends of each strip to make feet for the tracks. These feet will be helpful when we glue down the tracks.




Step 2: Begin to build your roller coaster by gluing down the strips to the paper. Create a variety of lines including straight, zip-zag, curved, spiral, diagonal, and loops. Be sure to put glue on the feet of each strip to secure it into place. Please hold it down for 10 seconds so that it stays in place.


                       

     


Step 3. Draw cars to add to the roller coaster. Be sure to add the dotted lines coming down from the wheels.

Step 4: Color the cars and cut them out. Fold the dotted lines back behind the wheels and put glue on the bottom. Attach the car to the track. 


Additional Art Activities for Remote Learners:

1. Name your roller coaster.

2. Identify the different types of lines in your roller coaster.

3. How fast does your roller coaster go?

4. Would you ride your roller coaster?

5. Draw, color, cut, and glue additional cars to your roller coaster.





Make a Paper Owl

Materials: paper, scissors, glue, crayons, markers
Step 1: Cut out a circle.
Step 2: Fold in the right and left sides of the circle to make the owl's wings.
Step 3: Fold down the top of the circle to make the owl's head.
Step 4: Cut out a variety of details such as eyes, a beak, feet, and feathers. Glue all of the pieces onto the owl.



Art Challenge: Teach a family member how to make the paper owl. 



   
STEAM Learning - Build a City

STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) exploration boosts the development of critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, hands-on learning, and creative thinking.

What types of buildings will be in your city? Maybe a skyscraper and a car garage? 
How many floors will your building have? How tall will your building stand? Is your building sturdy and strong? 

Challenge: Build a city using materials you can find in your home. One building needs to be able to hold the weight of a small toy figure or toy car.

Materials: Use what you have around the house such as blocks, books, paper cups, styrofoam, tooth picks, k cups, index cards, cardboard, coasters, and more. Use small toy figures or toy cars to complete the challenge.

Step 1: Gather your building supplies and small toys. Find a flat surface to build on such as a kitchen floor, table, or big books. 

Step 2: Begin to build by placing 4 foundation pieces at the bottom and put a piece of paper, cardboard or other flat material on top to create the floor. Experiment with other building techniques as you go. 

Step 3: Keep stacking higher and higher! Oh no! My building fell! That’s okay! Try again! 




Step 4: Add small toy figures to your building. Yikes! The building collapsed! That’s okay! Learn as you go! Is there a stronger material you can use to support the toy? 




Step 5: Play with your city. 

Step 6: Put back all of the building supplies where they belong. 






Sunday, September 6, 2020

Kindergarten - Torn Paper Owls

                Welcome to Art class at B. Bernice Young School! 

                    I'm your Art Teacher, Mr. Giannetto (Mr. G).


I'm so excited to begin the 2020-2021 school year with you! 

Please reach out to me if you have any questions, concerns, or if you need clarification or assistance with any art project. You are always welcome to substitute art materials for any given project with supplies you have available to you at home. 

Mr. Giannetto's email is vgiannetto@burltwpsch.org

Please follow me on Facebook: Young School Art with Mr. Giannetto
and Instagram @youngschoolartwithmr.g.

Ms. Hyland's Art Class October 26th-30th 

Monday:I will see all students who are attending school for in-person art class. We will make a torn paper project together in class.

Wednesday: All student Google Meet with Mr.G for virtual art class. This is our only time we will have a Google Meet this week. We will start the torn paper owl project below. I will demonstrate the project step-by-step. Please review the materials needed and have them ready for our Google Meet. You are welcome to substitute supplies with what you have available at home. 

Everyday this week: Feel free to visit our Google Art Classroom, view the art assignment, and click the link to travel here to my art website and work independently on this torn paper owl project. I will also include additional, optional art activities below. Scroll down and find Additional Art Activities for Remote Learners. 

Art Lesson: Torn Paper Owlets 

Materials: construction paper (choose any colors you wish and have available at home), scissors, markers, glue stick 

Five Owl Facts for Kids

1. A baby owl is called an owlet.

2. There are over 200 different kinds of owls. They are different colors and different sizes. 

3. Owls have large eyes and a flat face.

4. Owls are active at night. They are nocturnal.

5. Owls eat bugs, small animals, birds, and/or fish.


Step by Step Directions:

1. Draw the Owlet

Draw a large oval for the owl's body. Draw two triangles for ears at the top of the oval. Finally, draw two wings.

2. Rip the Paper

Pick a color you would like to use for the owl's feathers. Cut the paper into strips. Make small snips down the length of the strip. Rip the paper into pieces. Glue the pieces to the drawing to create feathers on the owl. Try to cover the whole owl.

Remember to pat down the pieces so that the owl doesn't lose its feathers!

3. Add Details

Cut out a diamond shape and fold it in half to make an open beak. 

Cut out small strips of paper for the legs and toes.

Trace a cup onto paper and cut out the two circles for eyes. Use a marker to draw the pupils. 

Glue on all of the pieces.

If you wish you may use a marker to draw the owl details instead of cutting and gluing due to time constraints.

Extend this Art Activity - Optional

Teach your family the owl movements you learned with Mr. G in the Google Meet.

Recall the 5 Owl Facts for Kids.

Draw food for your owl to eat.

Make a mom or dad owl to go along with the owlet.


Additional Art Activities for Remote Learners



  STEAM Learning - Build a City

STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) exploration boosts the development of critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, hands-on learning, and creative thinking.

What types of buildings will be in your city? Maybe a skyscraper and a car garage? 
How many floors will your building have? How tall will your building stand? Is your building sturdy and strong? 

Challenge: Build a city using materials you can find in your home. One building needs to be able to hold the weight of a small toy figure or toy car.

Materials: Use what you have around the house such as blocks, books, paper cups, styrofoam, tooth picks, k cups, index cards, cardboard, coasters, and more. Use small toy figures or toy cars to complete the challenge.

Step 1: Gather your building supplies and small toys. Find a flat surface to build on such as a kitchen floor, table, or big books. 

Step 2: Begin to build by placing 4 foundation pieces at the bottom and put a piece of paper, cardboard or other flat material on top to create the floor. Experiment with other building techniques as you go. 

Step 3: Keep stacking higher and higher! Oh no! My building fell! That’s okay! Try again! 




Step 4: Add small toy figures to your building. Yikes! The building collapsed! That’s okay! Learn as you go! Is there a stronger material you can use to support the toy? 




Step 5: Play with your city. 

Step 6: Put back all of the building supplies where they belong. 


Talk About Art
Were you successful at building a city?
What was the most challenging part?
What type of materials were the easiest to build with?
Which building was strong enough to hold the weight of your small toy?


Make a Paper Owl

Step 1:Cut out a circle.
Step 2: Fold in the right and left sides of the circle to make the owl's wings.
Step 3: Fold down the top of the circle to make the owl's head.
Step 4: Cut out a variety of details such as eyes, a beak, feet, and feathers. Glue all of the pieces onto the owl.

Art Challenge: Teach a family member how to make the paper owl.